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Pomegranate syrup recipe

Pomegranate syrup recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Dessert

Also known as pomegranate molasses. Alternatively, you could use it over pancakes, ice cream or anything you fancy.

24 people made this

IngredientsServes: 24

  • 1 litre pomegranate juice
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 125ml lemon juice

MethodPrep:5min ›Ready in:5min

  1. Bring the pomegranate juice, sugar and lemon juice to a simmer in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Once the sugar has dissolved, reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until the juice has reduced to 350ml, about 1 hour. Stir the syrup frequently as it thickens to keep it from burning. When the syrup is done, allow it to cool to room temperature, then pour into a glass jar and keep in the refrigerator.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(14)

Reviews in English (9)

by istanbuljaguar

I have friends in southeastern Turkey and each family makes this in their home each year. They love it drizzled on a salad with olive oil and lemon. But there, they only reduce the pomegranate juice plain.-13 Jun 2009

by S3

I made this recipe when I had some left over pomegranate juice that I would've thrown out. It cooked down very well to a good syrup. It was very sticky though so be careful!Maybe I would rate this higher if I liked pomegranate, but the taste wasn't my thing. Don't let that turn you off though. I encourage anyone with some leftover pomegranate juice to try this recipe, just to see if it suits their tastes. (I would make a small batch first, then make more if you like it.)-26 Jun 2008

by norcaljohnny

this is great! how middle easter(perisan to be exact) use this is with a curry chicken over rice and you pour some of this over the rice and chicken..result is delicious!-26 Feb 2009


Over 15 Ways to Use Pomegranate Molasses

Every week we pull together some great Canadian recipes from Canadian food bloggers around the web featuring one main ingredient or dish. This week we're featuring recipes that use pomegranate molasses or pomegranate syrup.

Editor's Note: This article contains affiliate links — full disclosure is at the end of the article.

Pomegranate molasses is a curious ingredient that's widely used in Middle Eastern cuisine. Chef Yotam Ottolenghi considers it a pantry staple and many of the bloggers we feature in this recipe collection refer to is as one of their favourite "secret ingredients" - and with good reason. This very simple ingredient is extremely versatile and very flavourful!

It's the main ingredient in Muhammara, a roasted red pepper and walnut dip that many of you are probably familiar with. You may have made it yourself or tried it at a party or potluck. (We have a few Muhammara recipes below for you to try).

But it can also be used in stews, sauces, dressings, cocktails, glazes, desserts - its sweet but tart flavour profile makes it very useful in the kitchen. You can learn all about Pomegranate Molasses in our One Curious Ingredient Profile (along with a recipe for how to make your own pomegranate molasses at home if you want to give it a try - it's quite easy!).

As often happens when we try an ingredient we're not familiar with, it can wind up sitting in our pantry for a long time because we're not too sure what else to do with it. Well, if you've got a bottle of pomegranate molasses tucked away and need some ideas we've got lots of delicious recipes for you to try.


Anthocyanins and Their Effect on Color and Flavor

Pomegranates get their bright pink-red color from a water-soluble pigments called anthocyanins, which are also responsible for the color in blueberries and red cabbage. Anthocyanins are sensitive to pH, meaning they change their color when submerged in solutions, dependingon the solutions’ concentrations of hydrogen ions. When dissolved in water, which has a neutral pH of 7, they turn blue in a solution with an alkaline pH, like one made with baking soda, they turn green and when mixed into an acidic solution like lime juice or vinegar, they turn red.

From a taste perspective, anthocyanins are reported to increase astringency and bitterness, which is why drinking pomegranate juice can make your mouth feel dry and will leave a lingering bitterness.

Anthocyanins are heat-sensitive, and if they’re heated too much or for too long they’re destroyed, so paying careful attention to how high the temperature of the juice gets and to how long it’s heated will help produce a pomegranate molasses with a vibrant color and flavor.


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This Condiment is Sweet, Tangy, and the Perfect Addition to Your All of Your Holiday Cooking

&lsquoTis the season to stock up on pomegranate molasses.

I like to think that I have lots of delicious secrets up my sleeve when it comes to cooking. I like to keep my guests on their toes, you know? That said, having a plentiful and diverse condiment selection is key to making impressive, flavor-packed food. The best way to (quickly) take a dish to a new level of flavor is to incorporate some type of sauce or condiment. And if there is one condiment that is underutilized and under-appreciated, it’s definitely pomegranate molasses. I need to have it stocked in my kitchen at all times, and I find myself reaching for it time and time again for so many different dishes. It is a staple in my kitchen and frankly, it should be in yours, too.

Pomegranate molasses is a sweet, fruity syrup that is a reduction of fresh pomegranate juice that’s sweetened with dates, sugar, or honey. Its tangy, acidic flavor brightens up any dish and its subtle sweetness is the perfect contrasting flavor to lamb dishes, roasted veggies, fish dishes, and cozy stews and braises. It makes for a great addition to salad dressings, marinades, glazes, and sauces. You can also use it in baking just like you would honey or molasses, so go ahead and mix into quick breads, muffins, breads, and cakes. This unexpected condiment packs a heavy punch of flavor to almost anything, making it an essential condiment in my cooking arsenal.

While this is certainly a condiment that you can use year-round, I think it’s most useful during holiday cooking because this is the time of year that fresh pomegranates are in season. During these winter months, a lot of the seasonal and holiday dishes are practically begging for some pomegranate molasses. Because fresh pomegranates can be hard to find and it can be quite a project to de-seed the arils, relying on pomegranate molasses is a great shortcut for incorporating sweet pomegranate flavor into whatever you’re making. I will be the first one to admit that breaking down a whole pomegranate is not the most fun kitchen task. That’s why I prefer to skip the hassle and just use pomegranate molasses for a concentrated pomegranate flavor. 

My recommendation is this — incorporate pomegranate molasses into all (yes, all!) of your holiday cooking. Everything from apps to mains to desserts, this rich condiment can take any dish to the next level. I love to cook with pomegranate molasses when I’m entertaining because people are always so taken aback and impressed by the flavor. “Why is this salad dressing so good? What is the sauce that you added to these roasted veggies?” I just smugly smile and tell them all about my obsession with pomegranate molasses. The greatest gift that you can give your loved ones this holiday season is the knowledge that such a glorious and versatile condiment exists. They will be thanking you for years and years to come.

Spread this liquid gold over some bacon-wrapped figs or a warm hunk of baked Brie for a sweet and savory appetizer. Toss it into a hearty kale salad or top off some roasted squash halves with a drizzle. If we’re talking Thanksgiving turkey, go ahead and glaze this year’s bird with a sweet, tangy pomegranate molasses sauce. Looking to braise some lamb for a show stopping holiday main? Go ahead and add some pomegranate molasses to that situation. Want to add an unexpected punch of flavor to your pecan pie or pumpkin cheesecake? Time to bring some pomegranate molasses to the party.

This holiday season, make sure you’re stocked up on pomegranate molasses. It’s going to take all of your dishes up a notch and your family will definitely be thanking you. No need to worry about fussing over a whole pomegranate, when you’ve got a whole bottle full of this goodness stocked away in your cabinet. Whatever you do, don’t ignore this underrated condiment.


INSTRUCTIONS

Remove the seeds (arils) from the pomegranate skin and inner pulp set aside. See our blog for three easy ways to remove the pomegranate seeds.

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the sugar, lemon juice, lemon zest and pomegranate juice to a boil, stirring occasionally. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 10 minutes. Skim the scum off the top if there is any.

Add the pomegranate seeds and bring to a boil again. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook the seeds until they are tender, about 8-10 minutes.

In a medium bowl, pour the pomegranate/sugar mixture thru a fine mesh sieve and using a wooden spoon or ladle, squeeze the juice out of the pomegranates seeds.

Once all the juice is removed from the seeds, discard the seeds. Pour the pomegranate juice back into the saucepan and add the salt. Simmer on low for another 15-20, minutes until the juice has evaporated a little and is a thick, syrupy consistency. Stir occasionally, making sure not to burn the sugar. (The longer that you simmer, the thicker the syrup will get).

Remove from heat and allow to cool in the saucepan for 20 minutes. Transfer to a glass jar and allow to cool completely before covering and storing in the refrigerator for up to 6 months.


  • pomegranate syrup (for serving)
  • ground cardamom (for serving)
  • edible rose petal (for serving)

Before serving, remove milk puddings from the fridge. Pour pomegranate syrup on top and sprinkle with ground cardamom, chopped pistachios, and edible rose petals. Enjoy!


Pomegranate Syrup Cake

Published: Aug 27, 2012 · Updated: Sep 28, 2020 · This post may contain affiliate links.

At almost exactly this time next week I will be getting ready to walk down the aisle and marry my darling fiancé. No longer will he be my fiancé because from that day onward he will be my husband and I will be his wife.

All but the finishing touches have been completed on our plans for our big day. But when I say big day it's perhaps somewhat misleading, because while it will still be a big day in our hearts, it will in fact be a very small gathering that will be celebrating our wedding. Apart from my husband to be and I, and his two sons, there will be 9 guests in total, which when it's come up in conversation has come as a surprise to most people.

And apart from the fact my best friend can't attend because she's sailing the high seas along the coast of France, I wouldn't change a thing.

My only hope is that we don't have any rain on the day, as we'll be getting married by the beach in Noosa, which is fitting considering we got engaged on a beach in Fiji 15 months ago. Hopefully this time though there will be no losing the ring!

So tell me, did you cry through your ceremony? And did it rain on your big day?


Pomegranate Simple Syrup Recipe

Make this gorgeous simple syrup with pomegranate! It is perfect for summer cocktails and cooling Italian Sodas, too.

  • Author: Brittany Bly
  • Cook Time: 15 Minutes
  • Total Time: 15 minutes
  • Yield: 8 Servings 1 x
  • Category: Beverage

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Mix together sugar and pomegranate juice and sugar in a saucepan.
  2. Place on medium high heat until a simmer begins.
  3. Reduce heat to low and keep it on a low simmer.
  4. Stir often and cook for 10 minutes.
  5. Allow to cool and store in the refrigerator.
  6. Garnish with fresh pomegranate arils, if desired.

Keywords: Pomegranate Simple Syrup, Girls Night Cocktails, Forbidden Fruit Syrup, Pop Shop America Recipes

Did you make this recipe?

Share a photo and tag us — we can't wait to see what you've made!

Need something sweeter or more tart? The amount of sugar can change based on your taste. Add more or less. For example, I usually make my Pomegranate Simple Syrup with 3/4 cup sugar and 1 cup juice.

Store your Pomegranate Simple Syrup in a cool bottle like this and make your simple syrup gift ready. It’s party perfect too!

This Pomegranate Simple Syrup is sweet, it’s tart, and it’s oh so fresh and fruity!


INSTRUCTIONS

Remove the seeds (arils) from the pomegranate skin and inner pulp set aside. See our blog for three easy ways to remove the pomegranate seeds.

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the sugar, lemon juice, lemon zest and pomegranate juice to a boil, stirring occasionally. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 10 minutes. Skim the scum off the top if there is any.

Add the pomegranate seeds and bring to a boil again. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook the seeds until they are tender, about 8-10 minutes.

In a medium bowl, pour the pomegranate/sugar mixture thru a fine mesh sieve and using a wooden spoon or ladle, squeeze the juice out of the pomegranates seeds.

Once all the juice is removed from the seeds, discard the seeds. Pour the pomegranate juice back into the saucepan and add the salt. Simmer on low for another 15-20, minutes until the juice has evaporated a little and is a thick, syrupy consistency. Stir occasionally, making sure not to burn the sugar. (The longer that you simmer, the thicker the syrup will get).

Remove from heat and allow to cool in the saucepan for 20 minutes. Transfer to a glass jar and allow to cool completely before covering and storing in the refrigerator for up to 6 months.